LM24: Audi survives Peugeot onslaught.

A short-lived, full-strength Audi charge leads the field for the opening lap of the 2011 race. - Image courtesy John Dagys.

After the intensity of Friday’s final qualifying session, any prediction that 2011 would be the tightest in recent history would be validated soon after. Although fraught with attrition, drama, searing intensity and many hours of caution periods, the event failed to disappoint.

Delivering stunning battles on virtually all fronts, the 2011 rendition of the race will likely be remembered for years to come as one of the closest-fought ever.

Intensity in the battle for outright honours was felt early for many at the head of the field. Audi’s hopes for defending victory suffered a massive blow during the early stages of the race.

Departure of the team’s #3 machine of McNish, Kristensen and Capello within the first hour, following a violent incident involving Luxury Racing’s Anthony Beltoise, had left many stunned. To the relief of all onlookers, McNish would walk away from the incident with little more than minor bruising.

Audi's Alan McNish walks away from Saturday afternoon's horrific crash. - Image courtesy Audisport.

Audi's Alan McNish walks away from Saturday afternoon's horrific crash. - Image courtesy Audisport.

A second horrific incident involving the #1 entry of reigning champion, Mike Rockenfeller and the #71 AF-Corse machine of Rob Kauffmann would occur during the eighth hour. The incident occurring as Rockenfeller attempted to pass Kauffmann on the high-speed section of the circuit between Mulsanne and Indianapolis.

Kauffmann later claimed the brightness of the R18’s headlights lead to his being unable to prepare for Rockenfeller’s attempted passing, and consequently made contact with the Audi driver at considerable speed. Rockenfeller would also escape from the wreckage uninjured – both incidents a testament to the build quality of Audi’s R18 chassis.

Remaining remnants of Rockenfeller's high-speed collision; Audi's second of the day. - Image courtesy Jean-Francois Monier.

Remaining remnants of Rockenfeller's high-speed collision; Audi's second major incident of the day. - Image courtesy Jean-Francois Monier.

Later analysis of the incident led officials to believe the #71 was at fault. Although allowing the AF-Corse-run entry to continue, race officials would take action against Kauffmann, excluding the American driver from the remainder of the event. The #71 would later retire.

Following the subsequent retirement of reigning champions Rockenfeller, Dumas and Bernhard, Audi’s hopes for a tenth Le Mans victory lied solely on the shoulders of young driving trio Treluyer, Lotterer, and Fassler in the #2 machine.

Audi #2 cruises Mulsanne with an evident lack of support; A much repeated scene throughout the remainder of the event. - Image courtesy AudiSport.

Audi #2 cruises Mulsanne with an evident lack of support; A much repeated scene throughout the remainder of the event. - Image courtesy AudiSport.

Hassled by a full-strength Peugeot onslaught throughout the remainder of the race, Audi’s young trio seldom faltered. Electing to quadruple-stint its driving trio (3-4 hours) to minimise time spent in pitlane, the marque faced an epic battle against both the scale and fuel efficiency of Peugeot’s attack.

With the French manufacturer capable of 12 lap stints, and Audi often running 11 laps within the same period, differences in operating efficiency would often be justified through outright pace and daring tyre strategy.

AudiSport pit strategy once again played a vital role in the team's success. - Image courtesy AudiSport.

AudiSport pit strategy once again played a vital role in the team's success. - Image courtesy AudiSport.

Late race drives by Treluyer and Lotterer would particularly impress the scale of Audi’s undertaking. With both drivers navigating slower traffic in an almost-manic fashion, pushing the very limits of grip afforded by sections of the 13.6 km circuit.

Despite spirited efforts from the Peugeot onslaught the #2 would never stray far from the overall lead. For a short period onlookers remained silent as race officials summoned Audi #2 engineer, Leena Gade to the stewards office with a tone of urgency on Sunday morning. This would prove to be of little consequence.

Having been seemingly immune to periods of carnage affecting virtually all competitors, cracks began to appear in Peugeot’s then-unhampered showing.

Bourdais commandeers Peugeot #9; later revealed as the marque's last hope for victory. - Image courtesy FotoOlaf

Bourdais commandeers Peugeot #9; later revealed as the marque's last hope for victory. - Image courtesy FotoOlaf

As Peugeot’s efforts began to falter, the prospect of victory, regardless of how close, would begin to slip out of reach. Oreca’s privately-entered 908 HDi-FAP would prove first to stagger during the night. As rapid Frenchman, Loic Duval damaged the team’s chassis on Mulsanne. Only barely managing to limp the injured car back to pitlane for repairs.

This scenario was later repeated with little under three hours remaining, as Duval experienced a second spin at Indianapolis under dampening conditions, further damaging the rear of the chassis.

The manufacturer’s all French squad of Sarrazin, Montagny and Minassian in the #8 found themselves the recipients of a drive-through penalty for a lack of respect toward circuit limits during the early morning hours.

The #8 Peugeot crew's efforts would be hampered by a late-race penalty. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

The #8 Peugeot crew's efforts would be hampered by a late-race penalty. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

Shortly after the #7 car of Davidson, Wurz and Gene would be damaged in a late race incident at Indianapolis, inflicting injury to the nose of the chassis. Enthusiastic repair efforts allowed the #7 to secure a face-saving fourth overall. Only out-placing the damage-plagued efforts of Oreca, who would manage fifth overall – marginally ahead of highest placing petrol contenders.

As the sole, remaining Peugeot on the lead lap, Pagenaud, Bourdais and Lamy – arguably the marque’s least favoured entry, found themselves in a position of opportunity. With the driver cycle broken, Pagenaud would be ceded to take the #9 to the checkered.

Lotterer brings the #2 Audi to pitlane for post-race celebrations. - Image courtesy AudiSport.

Lotterer brings the #2 Audi to pitlane for post-race celebrations. - Image courtesy AudiSport.

Despite the employment of questionable tactics from Pagenaud’s sister cars in the dying stages of the race, the #2 Audi proved an unstoppable force. With Lotterer at the helm, the German marque powered to one of the closest and, with little doubt, most emotional finishes in the event’s 79 year history.

Lotterer ultimately taking victory over Pagenaud by a margin of 13.854 seconds, covering a distance of 355 laps. The win marking a record tenth victory for Audi (from twelve starts). Allowing the Ingolstadt-based marque to oust Ferrari as the second-most successful marque ever, in terms of overall victories.

Neel Jani brings the remaining #12 Rebellion Lola-Toyota to the finish in sixth overall. - Image courtesy Lola Group.

Neel Jani brings the remaining #12 Rebellion Lola-Toyota to the finish in sixth overall. - Image courtesy Lola Group.

A fierce battle would also be contested within the LMP1 petrol contingent, involving Le Mans Series regulars, Pescarolo and Rebellion. Despite a clear focus on operational efficiency, both squads would face off against one another in an intense duel, exchanging the lead on many occasions throughout the race.

Pescarolo’s prospects suffered a cruel blow in the later stages of the race. With long-time Pescarolo stalwart, Collard falling victim to a race-ending shunt through the Porsche curves within two hours of the finish.

Rebellion Racing’s remaining #12 Lola-Toyota of Jani, Prost, and Bleekemolen would inherit the position vacated by Pescarolo’s retirement. The squad going on to secure sixth overall to place highest of the LMP1 petrol runners.

Kronos Racing’s seventh overall finish salvaged much-needed pride for an otherwise underhanded showing from British manufacturer, Aston Martin. With both factory AMR entries having bowed out of the race within hour one.

Oreca's factory LMP2 efforts would ultimately be undone as a result of late-race driver error. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

Oreca's factory LMP2 efforts would ultimately be undone as a result of late-race driver error. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

Predictions of an attrition-fraught race for LMP2 runners would turn out be unfounded, with P2 entries providing an intriguing display of mechanical reliability over the duration of the event.

Much of the first twelve hours saw the class lead exchange hands between Oreca-Nissan entries of SignaTech and the Oreca factory, along with reigning LMP2 champions, Strakka Racing’s HPD entry.

As the race developed, favoured HPD-powered entries of Strakka, Level5 and RML experienced minor hindrances. Strakka’s demise ultimately brought about due to damage sustained to the car’s undertray and engine, the result of overzealous kerb usage employed by the team’s drivers.

Both SignaTech and Oreca would also face issues throughout the event. The latter retiring due to an arguably over-ambitious drive by French Oreca driver, Hallyday in the final hours.

A quiet performer; the Greaves Motorsport Zytek-Nissan beat many higher-fancied entries to class victory. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

A quiet performer; the Greaves Motorsport Zytek-Nissan beat many higher-fancied entries to class victory. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

Nissan’s P2 engine package turned to be an unpredicted star of the category. The Zytek-tuned engine package seeing British Team, Greaves Motorsport to its maiden class victory – affording both Nissan and Dunlop their first LMP2 triumphs at Le Mans.

Although likely costing the team a victory, SignaTech’s woes proved not to be terminal. Allowing the squad of Ayari, Mailleux, and Ordoñez to take the checkered second in LMP2. Rounding out a 1-2 finish for the Japanese auto-giant.

Level5 Motorsport trio of Tucker, Bouchut and Barbosa fought against several issues to secure third in class. Salvaging pride for HPD’s already challenging 2011 campaign.

BMW Motorsport #56 leads chasing entries of Felbermayr and Luxury Racing to the start/finish straight. - Image courtesy J. Frauca Photography.

BMW Motorsport #56 leads chasing entries of Felbermayr and Luxury Racing to the start/finish straight. - Image courtesy J. Frauca Photography.

Highlighted by heated exchanges between the Pratt & Miller Corvette outfit, AF-Corse and, of course BMW Motorsport – the now premier GT category of GTE received surprisingly little television coverage over the course of the event.

After blistering performances in the lead up to the race, and during qualifying, BMW Motorsport discovered that outright pace does not seal the deal.

Recurring difficulties and race incidents plagued the Schnitzer squad’s efforts. With both the #55/56 entries encountering issues on a number of occasions.

Having lead from pole in the early stages of the race, the team’s #56 entry of Priaulx, Hand, and (D) Müller would recover to secure a podium finish for the Bavarian marque, with third position in class. The team’s #55 sister car of Farfus, (J) Müller and Werner failed to finish.

Flying Lizard's #80 approaches Tertre Rouge. - Image courtesy Olaf Foto

Flying Lizard's #80 approaches Tertre Rouge. - Image courtesy Olaf Foto

Albeit lacking in single-lap pace, Porsche’s hopes for class victory suffered similar blows. Despite the presence of several all-professional runners within the field, the highest-placed Porsche entry of reigning GT(2) champions, Felbermayr-Proton #77 would finish fourth in class.

Fielding a two car Le Mans assault for the first time, North-American team Flying Lizards also encountered their fair share of difficulties, from tyre punctures to electrical wiring faults. The squad’s #80 GTE-PRO entry of Bergmeister, Long, and Luhr finished the event taking sixth in class. Despite technical hindrances.

Porsche’s luck (or lack of) would persist in the GTE-AM category. After having lead for much of the race, the class-leading #81 Flying Lizard entry of  Neimann, Law, and Pumpelly succumbed to mechanical difficulties in the dying hours of the event.

Late race heroics from P&M #73 narrowly saved Corvette's Le Mans victory. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

Late race heroics from P&M #73 narrowly saved Corvette's Le Mans victory. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

For all the wrong, and right reasons the GT show was stolen by Corvette Racing’s Pratt & Miller-led operation. Having lead its class for most of the race, the US squad’s #74 entry of Magnussen, Gavin and Westbrook left the race in dramatic fashion during the final three hours.

Attempting to correct a corner exit leaving the Porsche curves, Magnussen collided with the #63 GTE-AM Felbermayr-Proton entry, with Felbermayr Snr then at the helm, making direct contact at a considerable speed with the drivers side door.

Magnussen would emerge unscathed. Much to the dismay of onlookers, Horst Felbermayr Snr – the oldest driver in the paddock – would slowly be removed from the battered Porsche chassis before exiting the circuit via ambulance.

Jack Leconte's privateer Larbre Competition squad secured a second victory for Corvette in the GTE-AM category. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

Jack Leconte's privateer Larbre Competition squad secured a second victory for Corvette in the GTE-AM category. - Image courtesy J.Frauca Photography.

Then second in class, AF-Corse inherited the GTE-PRO lead. To the dismay of Ferrari fans, this was short lived. Determined not to succumb to a second consecutive dramatic loss, Corvette’s chances for victory improved ten-fold courtesy of a hard-charging Milner in the remaining #73  P&M Corvette.

Milner’s recovery of the class lead soon after would be maintained, securing the US manufacturer’s maiden victory under GTE regulations at Le Mans.

Although providing the new 458 a podium finish on its La Sarthe debut, the #51 crew of Ferrari factory drivers Alesi, Fisichella, and Bruni were left to settle for second-placed finish.

Success at the hands of the Jack Leconte-lead #50 Larbre Corvette squad saw the achievement of a double victory for the US manufacturer. The squad’s French lineup of Bornhauser, Gardel, and Canal triumphant in the GTE-AM category. Affording Corvette consolation for the loss of its second factory machine.

Larbre Competition’s #70 GTE-AM Porsche entry also finished second in class. Rounding out a 1-2 finish for the outfit.

US team Robertson Racing finished third to secure a podium on debut. Also providing the FordGT its first podium at Le Mans in over 40 years.

LMS: Toyota-Powered Future For Rebellion.

 

Rebellion Racing's Judd-powered Lola, during the 2010 Le Mans 24H. - Image Courtesy Marshall Pruett/SpeedTV.com

Following a successful 2010 campaign, Rebellion Racing today confirmed the suspicions of many within the sportscar racing fraternity. During a press release, the Swiss team publicly announced the formation of a technical partnership with Toyota Motorsport.

As suggested by brief reports leaked weeks earlier, the agreement sees Rebellion Racing emerge as the official and exclusive partner of Toyota Motorsport within the LMP1 category for the 2011 season, with Toyota Motorsport supplying engines and technical assistance to the squad.

Although technical details regarding the engine package are not yet known, the origins of the powerplant are believed to be of SuperGT derivation and, with the team having reportedly completed successful tests with an interim package in both Portimao and Barcelona, development is already well underway.

Having secured contract renewals for Jani, Prost, Belicchi, and Boullion, the team also confirmed the return of its regular driving outfit for the 2011 season during the announcement. Additional drivers for the 24H have not yet been announced.

Rebellion Racing Team Manager, Bart Hayden issued the following statement:

“We are delighted to partner with Toyota Motorsport and we look forward to working alongside them, with this company with a rich history, ranging from Formula 1 to Le Mans. We look forward to establishing a solid relationship with them based on the long term. ”

Although currently a ‘toe-in-the-water’ approach, the news is perceived by many as the first tentative steps toward a possible factory return, and perhaps an early signaling of intent by the auto-giant to rectify unfinished business with Le Sarthe.

ALMS: Road America Results.

ALMS LogoRound seven of the 2010 American Le Mans series saw a resurgence of power in both LMP and GT categories. DraysonRacing achieved victory at the hands of young-ace, Johnny Cocker. Cocker’s last lap heroics enabled the team to take their maiden steps in victory lane. Podium finishes for both Cytosport and Highcroft entries ensure the championship race remains in contention.

In the GT category it was all about BMW and Rahal Letterman Racing. After a season of successful finishes, the team managed their first victory of the 2010 season courtesy of Dirk Müller and Joey Hand. Finishing a close second to the #90 BMW squad, Flying Lizard #45 extended their championship lead over rivals, Risi Competizione to a margin of eighteen points (previously eight).

Result listings can be seen in full below.

Pos. No. Cat. Drivers L. Gap Time Best Veh
1 8 P Drayson)/

Cocker*

69 -.— 2:45:15.756 1:52.420 Lola B09 60
2 6 P (Bernhard)/

Graf*

69 1.051 2:45:16.807 1:54.165 Porsche RS Spyder
3 1 P Brabham*/

(Pagenaud)

69 4.915 2:45:20.671 1:54.364 HPD ARX-01c
4 16 P (Dyson)/

Smith*

69 6.062 2:45:21.818 1:54.335 Lola B09 86 Mazda
5 99 PC Jeannette*/

(Julian)

67 2 Laps 2:47:03.672 2:02.189 Oreca FLM09
6 52 PC (Gonzalez)/

Diaz*

67 2 Laps 2:47:25.278 2:01.331 Oreca FLM09
7 90 GT Mueller/

(Hand*)

66 3 Laps 2:46:40.026 2:08.585 BMW M3 GT
8 45 GT (Bergmeister*)/

Long

66 3 Laps 2:46:42.643 2:08.494 Porsche 911 RSR
9 4 GT (Beretta)/

Gavin*

66 3 Laps 2:46:44.971 2:08.014 46 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1
10 3 GT Magnussen*/(

O’Connell)

66 3 Laps 2:46:53.376 2:08.591 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1
11 02 GT (Brown*)/

Cosmo

66 3 Laps 2:46:57.724 2:08.603 Ferrari 430 GT
12 62 GT (Melo*)/

Bruni

66 3 Laps 2:47:00.946 2:08.297 Ferrari 430 GT
13 95 PC Tucker/

(Wallace*)

66 3 Laps 2:47:02.433 2:02.728 Oreca FLM09
14 61 GT Salo/

(Kaffer*)

66 3 Laps 2:47:04.091 2:09.260 Ferrari 430 GT
15 01 GT Sharp/

(van Overbeek*)

66 3 Laps 2:47:11.984 2:09.022 Ferrari 430 GT
16 44 GT Law/

(Neiman*)

66 3 Laps 2:47:15.559 2:09.425 47 Porsche 911 RSR
17 17 GT Sellers/

(Henzler*)

65 4 Laps 2:45:23.251 2:10.007 Porsche 911 RSR
18 54 GTC (Pappas)/

Bleekemolen*

64 5 Laps 2:47:11.414 2:15.167 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
19 69 GTC (Rodriguez)/

Bieker*

63 6 Laps 2:45:32.785 2:16.447 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
20 88 GTC (Lewis*)/

Rice

63 6 Laps 2:46:38.188 2:16.852 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
21 23 GTC Sweedler/

(Kapudija*)

63 6 Laps 2:47:05.216 2:17.036 55 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
22 63 GTC (Ende)/

Lally*

63 6 Laps 2:47:22.677 2:15.600 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
23 28 GTC (Beggs)/

Baron

61 8 Laps 2:47:20.521 2:18.095 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
24 40 GT (Murry*)/

A.Robertson/

D.Robertson

59 10 Laps 2:45:23.138 2:09.852 4 Doran Ford GT-R
25 12 P Willman/

Burgess/

(Mowlem*)

59 10 Laps 2:46:50.752 1:54.422 Lola B06 10
26 89 PC (Marcelli*)/

Ducote

47 22 Laps 2:05:39.228 2:02.170 Oreca FLM09
27 36 PC Montecalvo*/(

Zugel)

36 33 Laps 1:35:22.889 2:06.706 28 Oreca FLM09
28 48 GTC Miller*/

(Hines)

36 33 Laps 1:39:10.451 2:16.737 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
29 75 GT (Dalziel*)/

Goossens

26 43 Laps 1:07:25.248 2:11.926 Jaguar XKR
30 92 GT (Auberlen)/

Milner*

8 61 Laps 19:55.187 2:09.310 BMW M3 GT
31 55 PC (Tucker)/

Bouchut

8 61 Laps 19:55.425 2:07.620 Oreca FLM09
32 32 GTC (Curtis)/

Sofronas*

8 61 Laps 20:46.054 2:19.090 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
33 37 P (J.Field)/

C.Field

6 63 Laps 13:58.047 1:55.436 Lola B06 10

Roush Yates Announces LMP Engine Supply Plans.

Lola-Roush Yates Ford Livery Render.

Lola's recently unveiled B11/80 Coupe will provide compatibility with Roush Yates' EcoBoost V6 engine. - Image Courtesy Lola-group.com

US-based performance engine manufacturer, Roush Yates have announced their intention to join the American Le Mans Series as an LMP2 engine supplier for the 2011 season.

Predominantly focused on Ford powerplants, Roush Yates will supply a single six cylinder engine based on Ford’s EcoBoost Turbo platform. In addition, the firm is also evaluating the potential of its existing V8 Mustang block for future LMP use.

Renowned LMP chassis constructor Lola has announced an agreement that will see the UK-based manufacturer provide compatibility for the package in both its open/closed cockpit future LMP offerings. As part of the agreement, the EcoBoost Turbo will be one of several engines available as a standard option to all Lola LMP2 customers.

John Maddox, Sports Car Program Manager for Roush Yates made the following statement:

“Everyone at Roush Yates Engines is excited to partner with such a prominent car constructor of LMP sports cars. We are proud to build exceptional engines to pair with Lola’s LMP2 design as we enter this innovative championship. Roush Yates Engines plans to use this opportunity to continue improving our technology and efficiency as we strive towards our goal of becoming world-class engine builders.”

The announcement marks Ford’s (albeit indirect) entrance to the ever growing list of LMP engine suppliers for the 2011 season.

Lola Unveils B11/80 LMP2 Coupe.

Lola B11/80 Coupe Render

Lola's recently unveiled B11/80 LMP2 Coupe. - Image Courtesy Lola-group.com

Last week SportscarGeek covered the unveiling of Lola’s latest open cockpit LMP2 offering, the B11/40. Lola has today unveiled its Coupe counterpart, the B11/80.

Like the B11/40, the closed-cockpit design features a strong resemblance to its predecessors, sporting many recent revisions seen on the current crop of Lola LMPs and its recently revealed open-cockpit counterpart.

Some of the notable changes to the chassis include an all-carbon bodykit, rear/side bodywork and air intake modifications, the addition of Lola’s quick-release bodywork and High-Torque transmission systems, an increased length wheel base, and the recently mandated ‘Shark-fin’ attachment, designed to increase aerodynamic stability.

Like the B11/40, the chassis will also provide compatibility with GT/Production engines from a wide array of manufacturers (i.e. BMW, Ford, HPD, Jaguar, Nissan, Toyota, Judd etc).

ALMS: Round04 Miller Results (Final).

ALMS Logo

Final result listings for round four of the 2010 ALMS series can be seen below.

Pos. No. Cat. Drivers No. Laps Diff. Total Time Best time Make
1 1 P Brabham/ Pagenaud 91 2:45:43.162 1:36.482 HPD ARX 01c
2 8 P Cocker/ Pirro 91 19.116 2:46:02.278 1:36.291 Lola B09 60
3 6 P Pickett/   Graf 91 1:30.374 2:47:13.536 1:36.558 Porsche RS Spyder
4 37 P J. Field/     C. Field 88 3 Laps 2:47:12.417 1:37.379 Lola B06 10
5 55 PC Tucker/ Bouchut 86 5 Laps 2:46:52.423 1:45.170 Oreca FLM09*
6 99 PC Jeanette/ Zugel 85 6 Laps 2:46:02.126 1:43.881 Oreca FLM09
7 52 PC Figge/   Hyatt 85 6 Laps 2:46:02.126 1:43.881 Oreca FLM09
8 95 PC Tucker/ Wallace 85 6 Laps 2:47:05.272 1:45.868 Oreca FLM09
9 62 GT Melo/Bruni 85 6 Laps 2:47:12.299 1:48.756 Ferrari 430 GT
10 92 GT Auberlen/ Milner 85 6 Laps 2:47:33.478 1:48.937 BMW M3 GT
11 3 GT Magnussen/ O’Connell 84 7 Laps 2:46:05.056 1:49.244 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1
12 90 GT Mueller/ Hand 84 7 Laps 2:46:11.695 1:48.937 BMW M3 GT
13 45 GT Bergmeister/Long 84 7 Laps 2:46:14.842 1:48.787 Porsche 911 RSR
14 61 GT Fisichella/ Vilander 84 7 Laps 2:46:28.464 1:48.977 Ferrari 430 GT
15 01 GT Sharp/ Van Overbeek 83 8 Laps 2:46:31.610 1:48.677 Ferrari 430 GT
16 02 GT Brown/ Cosmo 83 8 Laps 2:47:04.837 1:49.944 Ferrari 430 GT
17 17 GT Sellers/ Henzler 83 8 Laps 2:47:32.639 1:49.901 Porsche 911 RSR
18 12 P Willman/ Burgess 82 9 Laps 2:47:00.705 1:40.970 Lola B06 10
19 4 GT Beretta/ Gavin 82 9 Laps 2:47:23.430 1:48.801 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1
20 44 GT Law/ Neiman 81 10 Laps 2:45:51.873 1:50.281 Porsche 911 RSR
21 54 GTC Pappas/ Bleekemolen 80 11 Laps 2:46:39.628 1:54.717 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
22 63 GTC Richard/ Lally 80 11 Laps 2:47:37.581 1:55.612 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
23 69 GTC Rodriguez/ Bieker 79 12 Laps 2:45:51.699 1:56.140 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
24 88 GTC Lewis/Vento 79 12 Laps 2:46:00.724 1:56.516 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
25 48 GTC Miller/Hines 78 13 Laps 2:46:43.478 1:54.434 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
26 28 GTC Beggs/ Baron 78 13 Laps 2:46:53.195 1:57.975 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
27 40 GT D. Robertson/ A. Robertson/ Murry 78 13 Laps 2:47:27.043 1:51.399 Doran Ford GT-R
28 32 GTC Curtis/ Safronas 78 13 Laps 2:47:27.540 1:56.052 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
29 23 GTC Sweedler/ Kapudija 77 14 Laps 2:46:36.283 1:56.642 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
30 166 P Dyson/ Smith 73 18 Laps 2:17:44.701 1:37.220 Lola B09 86 Mazda
31 75 GT Dalziel/ Goossens 57 34 Laps 2:46:13.858 1:53.195 Jaguar XKRS
32 89 PC Marcelli/ Wong 21 70 Laps 45:15.632 1:48.269 Oreca FLM09
33 80 GTC Gonzalez/ Diaz 5 86 Laps 11:22.336 1:59.195 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup
34 81 GTC Gonzalez/ Leitzinger Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Ben Collins Joins RML Squad.

Ben Collins

Image Courtesy Lolacars.com

RML group has recently announced the addition of talented all-rounder, Ben Collins to their LMS driver lineup. Having driven a wide array of machinery from sports prototypes to saloon cars, 35-year old Collins is no stranger to the art of endurance.

RML team manager, Phil Barker responded to the renewed partnership with the following statement: “We enjoyed a very fruitful period with Ben, winning the ASCAR championship, and I have always been impressed by the standard of his driving.”

Collins will join RML’s existing lineup of Tommy Erdos, and Mike Newton in the team’s Lola-HPD Coupe, later this month for round three of the 2010 Le Mans Series, at the 1000km of Algarve.

24 Heures Du Mans 2010 – Post Race Wrap.

Bourdais leads Peugeot's assault into turn one. - Image courtesy of Geoffroy Barre / leblogauto.com

Bourdais leads Peugeot's assault into turn one. - Image courtesy of Geoffroy Barre / leblogauto.com

A brutal display of style, glamour, and speed, the Le Mans 24 Hour manages to provide an atmospheric roller coaster ride of raw emotion unable to be matched by any other event the world over on a yearly basis.

This year’s edition of the event bore a special significance for many reasons. For both fans and competitors, 2010 would provide the swan song for a once titanic GT category now left stagnant as a result of lacking manufacturer interest. For GT1 class competitors it’s the end of an era. After providing a worthy stomping ground for a selection of the world’s greatest supercars for the better part of the last decade, the GT1 category will see its last year of competition at the 24 Hour.

LMP categories would also see the final running of current-spec machinery before a major regulations change is enforced for the 2011 season. Although fraught with attrition, the 2010 running of the 24 hour classic delivered one of the more bizarre, yet mesmerising renditions of the race in recent years.

Hour one of the event saw the use of several, extended caution periods resulting in multiple safety car deployments. The first of which would be caused by the retirement of both Autocon and Beechdean Mansell entries. Several laps later the premature (yet highly anticipated) return of Jaguar (in the form of US-based, JaguarRSR) would succumb to a similar fate as a result of electrical difficulties. An innocent casualty of the events, Joest would lose over 60sec to the overall leading Peugeots. The disparity due to a difference in running pace between two of the circuit’s safety cars.

Peugeot #2 of Sarrazin/Minassian/Montagny. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Peugeot #2 of Sarrazin/Minassian/Montagny. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Having set the benchmark for single-lap pace, Peugeot had stamped its dominance early in both practice and qualifying sessions. The reigning LMP1 champions would commence from positions one through four, tailed by the trio of Audi entries, and the petrol-engined LMP field (lead of course by AMR). Despite possessing an obvious performance advantage during the first half of the race, the Peugeot squad would again be haunted by reliability issues.

Drama would strike late in the third hour for the #3 Peugeot of Bourdais, Pagenaud, and Lamy. Having been swiftly summoned to pitlane, the French squad would set to work furiously, with idle team members and spare bodywork to maintain any means of disguising the nature of repair efforts taking place. The pole-setting chassis was officially retired as a result of a front suspension failure.

Peugeot maintained a 1-2-3 formation at the front of the field and, with three factory Audis now only a small margin behind, the goose chase for the overall lead was well underway. Frustration would set in over the next several hours for both Peugeot and Audi squads. Peugeot #1 would be forced to pitlane courtesy of a failed alternator late during the seventh hour. With maintenance costing the French team over 12 minutes, ultimately taking the reigning champions out of contention for victory.

Peugeot would continue to hold positions 1-2, Audi remaining in close pursuit with cars #9/8 only a small margin behind. All the while AMR cars continued to turn consistent laps without error in positions 7/8 to maintaining their lead over fellow petrol-powered LMP1 counterparts. By mid race distance it was the Oreca Peugeot to suffer issues.

The Peugeot #2 squad completes one of the more successful pit stops of the day. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

The Peugeot #2 squad completes one of the more successful pit stops of the day. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

The team’s #4 entry being forced to pitlane, leaking oil as a result of engine faults. The #4 later returned to the race, losing thirteen minutes as a result of the repairs. Only some four hours later, the race leading #2 Peugeot would suffer a dramatic engine blowout on the approach to Tertre Rouge, resulting in a second factory Peugeot retirement.

This occurrence would prove to be a turning point for the Audi squad, inheriting the lead as a result of the #2 Peugeot’s retirement. With cars #9/8 now running in positions 1/2 respectively, the Joest cars would begin to increase pace as Peugeot opted for an all or nothing approach to victory. Despite being over a lap down on the leaders, the #1 car (at at the time driven by Davidson) had been instructed to take necessary action in order to ensure Peugeot victory (even at the cost of lower class participant’s safety).

Peugeot’s problems would only worsen throughout the remaining hours. While managing to reduce the margin to the leading Audi to under a lap, the sole factory #1 Peugeot would ultimately suffer a similar fate as its sister cars. Retiring in the dying hours of the race as a result of an engine blowout (now thought to have been caused by a faulty turbo).

With all factory cars now out of the running, the responsibility of flying the French marque’s flag would be left to the Oreca squad, and the hands of talented rookie, Loic Duval. Had Duval’s pace been maintained a podium position would have been possible for the local team. Unfortunately for the Oreca team the #4 would suffer a similar fate to it’s factory cousins. The car failing midway through the 22nd hour of the race, taking with it any chance of a face saving finish for the French manufacturer.

The race winning #9 Audi of Rockenfeller/Dumas/Bernhard. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

The race winning #9 Audi of Rockenfeller/Dumas/Bernhard. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Having not been able to compete with the single-pace set by their Peugeot rivals, the goal of would be to endure the imminent storm. Normally the fastest entry in the Joest camp, the #7 squad had suffered setup difficulties throughout practice and qualifying sessions, placing the car slightly off the pace of its #8/#9 sister cars.

The #7 would later suffer a delay early in the race as a result of a damaged BMW straying across the Porsche curves. Although not suffering any major damage, the #7 would be pitted for preventative maintenance. This unfortunate turn of events would shift the balance of power to the #9/8 Joest entries. Both of which would now be tasked with maintaining the chase for victory. The #9 crew had maintained consistent pace through the event, focusing on sustainable speed. The distinguished trio of Rockenfeller/Bernhard/Dumas would lead home cars #8/7 to secure an Audi 1-2-3 finish.

#42 ARX01c of Strakka racing. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

#42 ARX01c of Strakka racing. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Setting a pace bordering on cruelty, LMP2 had promised to be an HPD dominated affair from the outset.

With HPD-powered entries qualifying 1-2-3, and managing average lap times over four seconds faster than the nearest class competitors, P2 regulars were in for a tough day at the office. Having beaten race favourites Highcroft to the class pole, Strakka had immediately stamped their position as the team to beat.

Having lead the race for 356 laps (to Highcrofts 11 laps-lead) the Strakka trio of Danny Watts/Jonny Kane/Nick Leventis would finish first in category, placing an excellent fifth overall (only laps behind first-home petrol LMP1 team Oreca) to take their maiden 24 hour victory and, in doing so, handing the ARX01c a victory on its LM24 debut. In addition to this, the teams HPD package also won Michelin’s GreenX challenge.

Highcroft's Marco Werner navigates the Ralentisseur chicane. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Highcroft's Marco Werner navigates the Ralentisseur chicane. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Overshadowed by a myriad of technical difficulties, from shrapnel induced tyre punctures, to oil leaks and water pressure issues, the Danbury, Connecticut-based squad managed a semi-successful 24 Hour debut. Despite the presence of reigning champion David Brabham, multiple Le Mans overall winner Marco Werner, and up and coming endurance star Marino Franchitti, the Highcroft team were unable to match the speed and reliability of their Trans-Atlantic cousins. Plagued by misfortunes throughout the event, Highcroft would minimise the gap to their Strakka counterparts to less than two laps on several occasions. A margin which would unfortunately never be regained

OAK racing, and RML would round off the LMP2 podium finishing second and third respectively. In the unexpected absence of the Highcroft team, RML’s position would secure HPD’s second debut podium finish.

YoungDriver AMR leads the GT1 field through the Dunlop Esses. - Image courtesy of Geoffroy Barre / leblogauto.com

YoungDriver AMR leads the GT1 field through the Dunlop Esses. - Image courtesy of Geoffroy Barre / leblogauto.com

Contesting their final year of Le Mans competition, the GT1 swansong was, at times trying and, although well and truly outclassed by their GT2 counterparts the once mighty supercar category managed to produce a fitting outcome.

Dominated in its early stages by Matech and MarcVDS entries (both teams suffering race ending mechanical failures during the first half of the race) the ailing eight car category (consisting of six GT1WC entries) saw the lead shared by no less than six different entries throughout duration the race.

Despite the obvious pace of the Ford, Corvette, and Aston Martin entries, reliability would once again prove to be a deciding factor. Although not the fastest car in its category (or the category below it), Le Mans veterans and fan favourites Larbre Competition would finish the race with minimal error to take first in class, in a fitting tribute to both the category and machinery.

#82 Risi entry enters the Mulsanne. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

#82 Risi entry enters the Mulsanne. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Widely proclaimed as the new manufacturer stomping ground, and with seven marques present the GT2 category was set for a cracking battle. In typical Le Mans fashion, the Risi squad managed the surge to an early lead in the opening hours (despite having been relegated to the rear of the starting grid).

The team would go on to endure an intense battle with the P&M squad throughout hours six/seven. In an unfortunate twist, Risi would later suffer tranmission issues, forcing the #82 to pitlane for lengthy repairs, ruling them out of the chase for victory.

#63 Corvette of O'Connell/Magnussen/Garcia. - Image courtesy of Geoffroy Barre / leblogauto.com

#63 Corvette of O'Connell/Magnussen/Garcia. - Image courtesy of Geoffroy Barre / leblogauto.com

The #82 would later go on to retire as a result of the persisting difficulties. Leaving the P&M Corvette squad to dominate the category for what seemed like the majority of the event.

Running in 1/2 tandem for several hours, everything seemed to be going right for the American outfit. During a two hour period, disaster struck for the P&M team. The departure of the #63 P&M entry as a result of engine issues would leave the #64 to fly the remaining Corvette flag.

In a controversial incident, an impatient Anthony Davidson would attempt to pass the #64 Corvette entry of endurance veteran Emmanuelle Collard through the tight Porsche curves while on a late race charge for victory. This would cause Collard to lose control of the Corvette, sending the car spinning into nearby barriers. Suffering massive rear damage as a result of the impact, Collard would be forced to limp the severely damaged #64 back to pitlane where the team would furiously attempt a repair operation.

Davidson later commented on the incident in a bid to plead his innocence, only managing to insinuate Collard (amongst other GT competitors) had made intentional efforts to cause difficulty for the (then chasing) PeugeotSport team. Davidson retracted the statement/s in a later interview.

While the #64 did manage to return to the field, it would later retire as a result of engine issues similar to those suffered by the #63 car, leaving the justifiably distraught American team without any result.

A victim of late regulation changes, the #79 BMW Motorsport entry during the early hours of the race. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

A victim of late regulation changes, the #79 BMW Motorsport entry during the early hours of the race. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

A contender in its class, a fan favourite, and like many others, an unfortunate casualty. BMW’s return to La Sarthe was not as triumphant as many had originally hoped.

Having been hit with an increase in restrictor size (resulting in the loss of 10-15hp) upon arrival to La Sarthe, the manufacturer’s bid for victory would suffer a major setback from the outset. While down on single-lap pace, the aim of the Schnitzer squad was no doubt to endure the storm of inevitable attrition. A strategy adopted by the team during both Le Mans Series rounds.

Unfortunately for the Bavarians, sparks of promise were shown but reliable performance was not forthcoming. Suffering multiple tyre punctures (amongst other difficulties), the #79 would return to pitlane on several occasions during the opening hours of the race. The entry being officially retired after the eighth hour. The remaining #78 entry of Müller/Alzen/Farfus also experienced its fair share of difficulties but, despite tyre and engine difficulties would go on to finish sixth in category.

Felbermayr-Proton's class winning #77 entry of Lieb/Lietz/Henzler. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Felbermayr-Proton's class winning #77 entry of Lieb/Lietz/Henzler. - Image courtesy Geoffroy Barre / endurance-magazine.fr

Maintaining a sustainable pace throughout the race and opting to focus on reliability, the #77 Felbermayr squad would inherit the class lead shortly after the late race departure of Corvette #64. Having run a flawless race to edge out Risi,P&M, and BMW entries, the #77 crew found themselves with a two lap lead over nearest placed rivals, Hankook Farnbacher #89, and BMS Scuderia Italia #97 with several hours still remaining.

The trio of Lieb/Lietz/Henzler would continue to lead for the remaining hours to finish a phenomenal eleventh overall, taking Felbermayr’s maiden 24 Hour victory and, after years of Ferrari domination, reclaiming the LM24 GT2 crown for Porsche. A fitting triumph for Le Mans most successful marque.

With the curtains now drawn and the race now run and won for another year, the Sportscar world sits back to ponder…only another 12 months until the madness begins all over again.

Images courtesy Geoffroy Barre // Endurance-Magazine.fr // leblogauto.com

leblogauto.com

ALMS: Post Laguna Seca Race Wrap.

Guy Smith + Laguna Seca Pole

Guy Smith takes the pole for Dyson Racing during Friday qualifying at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. - Image courtesy John Dagys/Speedtv.com

Round three of the 2010 ALMS championship saw the series travel to an unusually cool Monterey for the inaugural running of the six hours of Laguna Seca.

Friday’s qualifying session featured several unexpected outcomes. The first and most notable of which being Guy Smith’s pole setting lap for Dyson Racing. With the former Le Mans winner besting the time of nearest rival, David Brabham by a convincing seven-tenths of a second. The 1:12.338 lap saw Dyson’s Lola-Mazda to its maiden pole position.

Brabham later claimed to have been satisfied with Highcroft’s setup of the ARX01c, but conceded the team’s HPD machine was unable to compete with the obvious straight-line pace of Dyson’s Mazda-powered Lola, afforded by IMSA’s recent restrictor breaks. Highcroft would later be relegated to the rear of the grid as a result of a post-qualifying penalty.

Risi leads ESM/GT2 field into turn one.

#62 Risi leads the GT field into turn one. - Image courtesy John Dagys/Speedtv.com

The GT category once again played host to a brutal onslaught of speed from all marques on display. Risi Competizione’s Jaime Melo seized class pole with a 1:22.752. Johannes Van Overbeek would spark the second upset of the session, taking the #02 Extreme Speed Motorsports entry to second place on the grid to secure an all Ferrari front row.

Despite having achieved a fast lap merely .732 sec from the pole setting time, the usually dominant #45 Flying Lizards entry of  Bergmeister/Long were left to settle for eighth place on the grid.

Six hours Laguna Seca 2010 Start

Dyson leads the field approaching turn one. - Image courtesy John Dagys/Speedtv.com

Looking set to deliver on all fronts, the inaugural running of the six hour commenced in an eventful manner. Although starting from the rear of the grid, Highcroft’s Simon Pagenaud managed to fight through a gaggle of GT and challenge class competitors to reach fourth position overall during the opening laps of the event.

In somewhat of an ALMS tradition, Intersport’s #37 Lola-AER surged to the front of the field during the opening moments of the race, leading laps 1-38, later retiring due to engine related issues.

Intersport’s premature departure would see Highcroft inherit the race lead early during the second hour, with both MuscleMilk and Dyson entries remaining in close pursuit. The MuscleMilk squad would run as high as second before suffering race-ending transmission difficulties.

Despite early race dramas Dyson would remain in close pursuit of Highcroft throughout the event, with the squad’s Lola-Mazda even soaring to the overall lead during the fifth hour.

Clever strategy from Highcroft saw Franchitti maintain the race lead following a final pit stop. Dyson would minimise the margin to Highcroft below 26sec before suffering a race-ending mechanical failure in the dying stages of the race. Allowing the Connecticut-based squad to cruise to a second victory for 2010.

Highcroft + Laguna Seca six hours.

The Patrón Highcroft squad take the second victory of the 2010 season. - Image courtesy /Speedtv.com

Marked by intense battles between the factory-supported teams of Risi, P&M, RLR, and FLM, the GT race served as a brutal reminder of the pace at which the once Ferrari and Porsche dominated class now operates.

Dominated by no single entry, the GT class saw no less than six different runners share the lead throughout the duration of the race. Heated exchanges throughout the entire field marked the opening hours. The Rahal Letterman squad would maintain the race lead for the majority of hours two through four. With the team’s #92/90 entries running in 1-2 tandem on several occasions.

Flying Lizard Porsche, Rahal Letterman BMW, Pratt and Miller Corvette, Run to corkscrew

The #45 FLM Porsche of Patrick Long does battle with RLR/P&M in the dying stages of the race. - Image courtesy John Dagys/Speedtv.com

Despite an unfortunate result in qualifying, the #45 Flying Lizard entry would gradually work its way through the GT field over the course of the event. With Bergmeister reaching third in class after half race distance.

Clever pit strategy formulated by the Lizard’s chief strategist, Thomas Blam, saw the defending GT2 series champions inherit the lead late during the fifth hour. Leaving Porsche factory ace, Patrick Long to defend against a charging Joey Hand in the #90 RLR BMW, with the #3 Corvette of Oliver Gavin in close pursuit. The trio would ultimately finish in this order, with Long managing victory by a margin of .3sec to ensure another nail biting finish for GT class runners.

LMPC entries of Level5, Genoa, and GreenEarth Gunnar battle into the darkness.

LMPC entries of Level5, Genoa, and GreenEarth Gunnar battle into the darkness. - Image courtesy John Dagys/Speedtv.com

Now very much a part of the ALMS family, the LMPC category played host to a spirited exchange throughout the six hours between

Level5, Genoa, and Green Earth Gunnar entries. Much to the dismay of onlookers, the Team Gunnar entry would experience late race issues, forcing the #99 to a premature exit from the battle for class honours, but going on to finish third in category.

The #55 Level5,  and #36 Genoa entries were remained in an all out brawl to the finish, with experience proving to be the deciding factor. Bouchut taking the victory for Level5, followed by Genoa’s Tom Sutherland who would cross the line in second, a mere  seven seconds behind the endurance veteran.

Much like their faster GT class cousins the GTC category was, at no stage of the race, a single horse show. Entries of Alex Job, TRG, Velox, BlackSwan, and Orbit all experienced a share in the class lead over the course of the afternoon.

The #54 BlackSwan entry of Pappas/Bleekemolen/Bleekemolen would ultimately prevail, taking victory ahead of Andy Lally in the TRG #63, who would later cross the line to take second, followed by the #81 Alex Job entry of Leitzinger.

LMS: Spa – Free Practice 1/2 Thoughts.

Audi vs Peugeot + Spa + Pitlane.

The Audi vs Peugeot rivalry, still very much alive. - Image courtesy Endurance-magazine.fr/Geoffroy Barre.

Practice sessions for round two of the LMS season commenced at the Spa-Francorchamps circuit today. Despite the slightly out of character weather, all teams were out and about taking advantage of the testing opportunity presented. Practice session one opened in damp conditions, with the LMP1 teams all taking to the track early.

Both teams opted for a slightly conservative approach in the opening session, the difference between start and finishing times being around 15 seconds. The Oreca Peugeot of Panis taking the fastest time of the session with a lap 2:14.068, closely followed by the two factory Peugeots and a petrol interloper in the form of the #12 Rebellion Lola. Audi opted for an even more conservative FP1 than their French rivals, deciding to keep Kristensen in the #7 for the majority of the session. The Dane would set a time of 2:18.715 before handing the reigns to Capello in the final laps of the session.

Peugeot 908 + Spa.

The #3 Peugeot of Pagenaud during free practice. - Image courtesy Endurance-magazine.fr/Geoffrey Barre.

The second practice session saw a factory Peugeot 1-2-3, with Pagenaud first to penetrate the 2:00 barrier. The Frenchman setting a lap of 1:59.826, taking the #3 to the top of the timesheet. Audi once more maintained a consistent pace throughout, using the opportunity to test differing tyre compounds. Treluyer would set the fastest lap for the Audi camp, with a 2:02.894, marginally besting the Oreca-Peugeot of Duval. Rebellion continued to maintain pace with the diesel powerhouse for most of the session. The Swiss teams’ #12/13 Lolas settling in positions 8/9 overall.

The LMP2 category saw much movement in the two sessions, the class lead changing hands on several occasions. The teams of Quifel, Bruichladdich, RML, and Strakka all shared time at the top end of the timesheets. RML’s Tommy Erdos setting the fastest time of FP2 with a lap of 2:06.858.

GT1 was a somewhat confusing affair. The field now running to FIAGT1 specifications often had difficult maintaining pace with GT2 entrants. YoungDriver AMR consistently improving pace over the two sessions, Stefan Mücke setting fastest lap of the class in the form of a 2:20.044 during the FP2 session, closely pursued Matech’s Ford GT of Beche with a 2:20.806.

Schnitzer/BMW Motorsport E92 M3

Schnitzer's BMW E92 M3 during FP2 - Image courtesy Endurance-magazine.fr/Geoffrey Barre.

Looking set to provide another epic battle, the jostling for position continued in GT2. The lead being exchanged between Hankook, Felbermayr, and JMW throughout sessions 1/2. After being instructed to ‘push the car’ JMW’s Rob Bell managed a time of 2:21.318 to take the lead in class, marginally besting the Felbermayr Porsche of Lietz, who would settle for a 2:21.561. While the names of AF-Corse, BMW-Schnitzer, and IMSA were all absent from the top end of the timesheet, GT2 continues to feel very much like the calm before a storm.

Images courtesy of Geoffroy Barre / http://endurance-magazine.fr/